In Riga it is Saturday, April 20th, 2019, 11:45 PM
Home Who we are News

Hands-On Activities Featured at Latvian Museum for Montgomery County Heritage Days June 29-30,2013

June 17, 2013

Rockville, MD:  June 15, 2013

The Latvian Museum in Rockville, Maryland will offer a variety of hands-on experiences  for visitors of all ages during Montgomery County Heritage Days, June 29 and 30, 2013.  Visitors can learn to decorate Easter eggs with natural  dye, create a metal  pendant with ancient Latvian designs , try their hand at the Novus game or playing the kokle, a traditional zither-like musical instrument.

A special exhibit at this year’s event will focus on the role of song festivals in Latvian culture. On display will be two folk costumes worn at Latvian song festivals in North America, festival souvenirs  and programs. There will be a DVD screening of the song and dance festival held in Riga, Latvia in 2008. 

The program also includes tours of the museums’ exhibits and the Latvian Lutheran church and its spectacular stained glass windows.   Knowledgeable guides will share their stories of the WWII immigrant experience.  Latvian jewelry , crafts, books, and some traditional foods  will be on  sale.

The Latvian Museum will be open for Montgomery County (Maryland) Heritage Days  June 23 and 24 from 12 noon to 4. Admission and parking are free.  Refreshments will be served.

The Latvian Museum  is operated under the auspices of the American Latvian Association of the US, Inc.  (ALA).  The museum is located at the Latvian center at 400 Hurley Avenue, Rockville, MD, that includes the Latvian Lutheran Church and the headquarters of the ALA.  

For information on the Montgomery County Heritage Days program at the Latvian Museum, contact  Museum program coordinators Lilita Bergs at lbergs1027@gmail.com  (301) 762-1645 or Anita Terauds at johnterauds@comcast.net, 301 384-5352.

For more information on ALA and to see  views of the museum’s history and folk arts exhibits, visit www. alausa.org./museums.

 

Photo attachments:

Children making metal pendants with ancient Latvian designs

Valdis Karklis.  playing the kokle